artist in residence | 2012

Jim Lockey

Jim Lockey lives and works in Kent, UK. Jim was born in 1987, and is married to fellow artist Katy Norton. He completed his Masters and BA hons degree in Fine Art at The University For The Creative Arts (UCA), graduating in 2010. Jim's work is about creating fictions and the process of art itself. Working predominantly with text, video and performance he explores the complex relationship between artifact and viewer. He is the curator at LIMBO Arts, Margate and current Artist in Residence at the Swedenborg Society, London.

Education

MA Fine Art, UCA Canterbury, 2010

BA (hons) Fine Art, UCA Canterbury, 2009

Solo Shows

2009 Time-Based Artwork, Foamshrimp

Two-Man Shows

2010 The Society Of The Lost Games, various locations, Kent

2009 Re-enactment, Black Project Space UCA, Canterbury

Group Shows

2011 Folkestone Fringe, Folkestone Triennial

2011 Art Lands On Alien Landscape, LIMBO, Margate

2010 Scopos: The Watcher, Keleidoscope Gallery, Sevenoaks

2010 Neither Use Nor Ornament, Herbert Read Gallery, Canterbury

2010 Whitstable Biennale satellite program, Whitstable

2010 History of Time to Come (zine giveaway), Crate, Margate

2010 100 Journals, Herbert Read Gallery, Canterbury

2009 In Response, The Harbour Arm Gallery, Margate

2009 The Beard Show, Substation, Margate

2009 AlTURNERtive, Crate, Margate

2009(twice) Souvenir Film Circus, Orange Street Music Club, Canterbury, & Vue, Folkestone

As Curator

2011, Art Lands On Alien Landscape, Limbo, Margate

2011, TO PAY TRIBUTE TO THE GENEROSITY OF THE THREE-MINUTE PUNK-ROCK SONG (events programme), Crate, margate

Exhibition Opening | in conjunction with the Bloomsbury Festival 2012 | 20 October 2012 | 6-9 pm

Jim Lockey has created three new works in response to Emanuel Swedenborg’s theological writing. The exhibition includes: the exegetical study of mundane architecture, photographs of hidden realities, and documentation of a pilgrimage to discover all of art. Whilst the narratives Jim creates within his works are never more than plainly fictional they invite close inspection of our distinctions between what is real and what is imagined.

Further information.